Tiffany Bolling

Like a lot of the ladies we feature in this section of the website, not a lot is known about Tiffany Bolling. She made a handful of interesting exploitation films, had a somewhat popular record, and quietly disappeared afterwards. I’ll talk a little about her life and then feature a few films I think are of interest to those of you that read this website.


Born Tiffany Royce Kral on February 6, 1947, in Santa Monica, CA, exploitation actress Tiffany Bolling’s parents Roy Kral and Bettie Miller were both talented musicians and performers. At the young age of 16, Bolling began singing in local coffee houses and would first break into show business purportedly doing stunt work on the TV show Flipper (1964 – 1967). After several more one-off appearances in various TV shows and after a rumored affair with singer/song-writer Frank Sinatra, she would attend 20th Century-Fox’s talent school to hone her acting skills.

In 1970 Canyon Records released her only attempt at a recording career with the album Tiffany. Side A featured a Beatles cover tune Let It Be and side B contained Thank God the War is Over, a track that would be considered for a Grammy nomination. Both songs are well produced and saw limited success, but not enough for her to pursue a full-fledged music career. Bolling’s first credited film role came when she took a part in Bernard Glasser’s TRIANGLE (1970). Her career as an actress spanned 31-years with 31 IMDB credits, many of which are guest spots on various television shows. Her exploitation movies are finite in number, so there are only a handful of films worth mentioning. All of her genre efforts met with modest success, at least in terms of low-budget filmmaking.

THE CANDY SNATCHERS (1973)

We recently covered this picture on the BBandBC podcast but I decided to include it here because I feel it’s worth your time. THE CANDY SNATCHERS is based on the true story of Barbara Jane Mackle. The 20-year old Mackle was kidnapped and buried alive for 80+ hours until her father paid the half-million-dollar ransom for her whereabouts. This is the basic premise of THE CANDY SNATCHERS. Being a product of the early 70s and an exploitation picture, the viewer is subjected to themes of strong violence, rape, child abuse (including pedophilia), and poor behavior as part of the picture’s subtext. As Jessie, Bolling is a lot of fun to watch because she’s downright sexy even though her character has consistently deplorable behavior. Let’s face it – if you’re going to kidnap a young girl and bury her alive for a large ransom, you have to play to the deplorable side of things to make the picture work. Bolling does just that.

BONNIE’S KIDS (1973)

Sisters Myra (Robin Mattson) and Eleanor “Ellie” Thomas (Tiffany Bolling) live in a backwater California town with their hard drinking, abusive stepfather who was married to their now deceased mother Bonnie. When the sleazy stepfather attempts to rape the younger Myra one night in her bedroom, Ellie intercedes with a shotgun to end the ordeal (despite good ‘ol stepdad’s offer for her to join the fun). Fleeing the scene of the crime, the sisters end up in the big city, seeking shelter with their only known relative uncle Ben Siemen (Scott Brady). Ben dupes the brassy Ellie into getting involved with a money laundering scheme. Once she uncovers the true situation, she double crosses her uncle and escapes with the cash. She reaches out for Myra to join her on the run, but the uncle and his hitmen pals pursue the girls leading to a number of bloody confrontations. Bolling portrays a beautiful, sassy and world-weary young girl whose circumstances force her to mature at a rapid pace. She cares deeply for the well-being of her younger sister in her mother’s absence. The world of BONNIE’S KIDS represents men as predators – aggressive, manipulative, and given to a primal nature targeted at the subjugation of the young women. Both thematic elements provide motivation for Ellie’s terrible decisions, much to the delight of the audience (hey, it’s pure exploitation in its most basic form). Directed by genre film veteran Arthur Marks, the film delivers sex, sleaze and slaughter in a reasonably well paced film carried by Bolling’s performance.

THE CENTERFOLD GIRLS (1974)

The IMDB synopsis for THE CENTERFOLD GIRLS reads as follow: “A depraved religious fanatic sets out to punish all the “immoral” women who have posed for the center-fold of a men’s magazine”. This picture is similar to that of an Amicus anthology. It contains three different stories that uses the character of Clement Dunne (played by Andrew Pine) to tie them together by the end of the picture. During the third act of the film, “The Third Story”, Clement meets Vera played by Tiffany Bolling. We learn quickly that Vera is a very resourceful woman making it difficult for Clement to do his job. She is his perfect match. In my humble opinion, Bolling is why this movie works as well as it does. This is a great 70s exploitation film needing more exposure with today’s genre fans. It’s chock full of nudity and sleaze. In fact, there’s so much gratuitous bare flesh exposed for the viewer’s pleasure, this entertaining little gem may well qualify for next year’s Mamorial Day Special podcast episode.

KINGDOM OF THE SPIDERS (1977)

William Shatner, Tiffany Bolling, Woody Strode, Marcy Lafferty, Lieux Dressler, David McClean and Altovise Davis. This is the amazing cast for KINGDOM OF THE SPIDERS. Oh, let’s not forget about the director, B-Movie Renaissance man John “Bud” Cardos. JAWS (1975) is clearly to blame for this nature gone bad movie. In fact, dozens and dozens of other killer animal pictures or nature gone amuck films followed in the path of Spielberg’s 1975 blockbuster. A small Arizona community is inundated with a horde of ravenous tarantulas. This is first discovered when a prized bull is found dead, followed by the disappearances or deaths of smaller animals around the small community. Just like the low-budget atomic age films that came before KINGDOM OF THE SPIDERS, the whole town of Verde Valley becomes overwhelmed by hairy spiders. It’s a throwback of sorts using the exact same elements of the aforementioned JAWS. Bolling is terrific as is the rest of the cast who all play their roles with enough gravity to sell a ridiculous story. In fact, you gotta give it up for everyone that allowed dozens of real tarantulas to crawl on them for the sake of this cheesy low budget picture. I highly recommend watching this right alongside the newer spider-themed creature feature film, EIGHT LEGGED FREAKS (2002).

There you have it. Four worthy pictures that include the beautiful and talented Tiffany Bolling. Like so many other exploitation actresses of the time, she made a memorable impact in genre film that will never be forgotten since we’re still watching and writing about them.

For those looking to explore the filmography of Tiffany Bolling, here’s a short list of notable movies:

THE CANDY SNATCHERS (1973)
BONNIE’S KIDS (1973)
WICKED, WICKED (1973)
THE CENTERFOLD GIRLS (1974)
THE WILD PARTY (1975)
KINGDOM OF THE SPIDERS (1977)
LOVE SCENES (1984)

Do you have a favorite Tiffany Bolling film you’d like to discuss? If so, we’d love to hear from you. Just drop us a comment below.

Contributed by: Mike Murphy

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